Archive for the ‘home’ Category

Indoor Gardening video

This video shows an example of a great way to grow food indoors.

Feng Shui Organizing Tips for Fall

From an interview with Feng Shui expert Betsy Stang.

This fall Feng Shui primer will help you nurture yourself and bring more prosperity into your life while you get back to work or school. The organizing guidance is rooted in honoring the seasonal changes, clearing out the old and bringing in the new, and as such connects you more deeply to yourself and the natural world around you. Welcome in the new season and get organized, too, with these fall feng shui tips:

As the days get darker as we move away from the Summer Solstice, an underlying fent shui theme for the fall is to organize in ways that will help you be warm and cozy.

Start Nurturing Yourself More – Clear the Kitchen
* Clear the clutter from the counters.
* Separate condiments from nutritional supplements.
* Organize your grains to reduce grain moths.
* Make sure you have one nice spot to feed yourself, one nice place to nourish yourself and those in your family.
* Bring into your kitchen the last of the local produce and ingredients for healthy soups.

Warm Up Your Environment
* Bring some warm tones into the house by switching some throw pillows or throws; this will make the home feel cozier.
* Pay special attention to bringing some warm colors into your bathroom so it doesn’t feel cold in the winter (if the colors are cooler to begin with, such as blues).
* Get your heating system checked; clean the chimneys and fireplace; maintain your hearth.
* Stock up on yellow and orange vegetables for autumn food.

Make Seasonal Changes at the Main Entrance, Inside and Out
* Make sure the front door entrance is clear. This is important at times of seasonal change since we tend to keep things there that we don’t need for the coming season.

Get Ready for More Time Indoors
* Organize the area around your desk, since you will be spending more time indoors.

* If you don’t know where to put your piles, put them in baskets.
* Put your favorite books in a nice basket with a cozy throw and establish a reading nook.

Move Out the Old to Welcome the New
* Go through the medicine cabinet and throw out all the medicines that have expired.
* Donate finished summer reading to the library or hospital.
* Recycle all your old newspapers and all other recycling. (It is hard to haul a lot in the winter.)
* Go through your closets as you are switching your clothes and take the time to put clothing aside that you are no longer going to wear and give it away. Except for formal clothes, if you haven’t worn it in two years let it move out of our life.

Establish Some Seasonal Fall Habits
* Flip your mattress to eliminate a groove from sleeping in the same spot; this is better for your spine.
* Replace your emergency water supply.
* Check your pantry for emergency food supplies (and make sure you have a non-electric can opener).
* Clean out and check your car, including tire pressure (which changes at different temperatures.)
* Check your light bulbs and replace with energy efficient light bulbs so you have enough light for the winter.

via Feng Shui Organizing Tips for Fall | Healthy and Green Living.

Veggie Trader: A Craigslist for Local Produce

Selected from Green Options

How great would it be if there were want ads in your local newspaper or on Craigslist for organic fruits and vegetables, grown in your town, by your neighbors? A new website – Veggie Trader has sprung up that offers exactly such a service–a purchasing and bartering clearinghouse for locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Veggie Trader describes itself as the “place to trade, buy or sell local homegrown produce.” The idea is simple: you register on the website and then offer to purchase, sell, or trade any manner of surplus fruits or vegetables. If you have too many tomatoes and want to see if anyone nearby has a surplus of peaches or peppers, you can log on, run a search, and find out who in the neighborhood may be willing to exchange with you.

It’s a great way to offload additional produce and exchange it for something that you might be unable to grow in your own yard, but that another gardener may specialize in growing. It’s totally free to join, and costs nothing to post an offering, or place a wanted listing.

The website only started four months ago, and is definitely still in its infancy. Despite that, they have over 6,000 people signed up so far. The folks who have registered thus far are concentrated on the U.S. West Coast in California and Oregon, but since the website is still starting out, it could very well extend to your neighborhood. You can help make the website grow by registering and offering to buy, sell, or trade for whatever produce you have or may want.

Veggie Trader has ambitions to expand to include dairy, eggs, and meat, all items that are heavily regulated. The future may hold great things for Veggie Trader, only time will tell if the site can attract enough members to gain enough momentum to make a difference in the local food movement, but we’re certainly rooting for them.

via Veggie Trader: A Craigslist for Local Produce | Healthy and Green Living.

How to start a garden, save money, and eat fresh!

AARP the magazine featured a great article recently, detailing a full plan for a vegetable garden in your yard. I’ve been looking for something like this all summer! This year was too busy and I spent too much time away from home to start my organic vegetable garden, but I’m armed with all the information I need to get a great start on next year!

The article talks about specific plot sizes, how to prepare your soil, keep out greedy animals, what is will all cost and how much you can save on groceries.

The author also points out how a garden can be a teaching experience:

Most vegetables are annuals, planted anew each year, but I tuck in a few alpine strawberries, too. These tiny, exquisite plants bear fruit all season and remain in place from year to year, to our grandchildren’s delight. They head for the strawberry row the minute their parents pull up in the driveway. Our sugar snap peas and cherry tomatoes are also kid magnets, and I like to think our small foragers are gleaning far more than a healthful snack. They’re learning that growing food brings joy, and that dividend is priceless.

I would add to that, not only does growing food bring joy (which it definately does) but also that it nurtures an understanding that the food you grow needs balanced care, sunlight, water, protection etc, just as people do. This lesson makes it easier to understand why it is unhealthy for people to eat and drink junk and fake foods, and to have respectful balanced care for their own bodies. What a great lesson to draw on, especially in the teen years!

Dirt Cheap Eats.

Documentary: Food Inc.

Where Does Your Food Come From?

posted by Dave Chameides Jul 28, 2009 9:02 am

I had the opportunity to see Food Inc the other night and to say that I was blown away is an understatement. The trailer below says much more than I can ever say here about this important topic but suffice it to say this is a movie that everyone should see.

Few choices in our lifestyles have as much of an impact on the planet as our food choices do. What I like about this movie is that it gives you a fair amount of facts that you probably didn’t know in order to scare you a bit but educate you at the same time, and then leaves you with concrete ideas on how you can make a difference. Also, hearing folks like Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma) and Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation) expertly break down these hard truths into digestible pieces makes it easy to understand what is happening out there without being an expert yourself.

Have you ever considered how far your food travels to get to you and what companies must do to keep it “fresh” during that journey?

Are you aware of the amount of corn you eat (it’s in almost everything processed) and what it is doing to you and our ecosystem as a whole?

Do you know the amount of contaminants factory farms put out into our waterways?

We have been trained as a society to buy food at the supermarket, get it as cheap as possible, and not consider where it came from, who it effects, or what it is doing to us. When you think about it, the whole thing seems fairly irresponsible.

Thankfully, we all have the power to change this system. The Food inc website has some great resources to check out after you’ve seen the movie including 10 Simple Tips towards eating better which will help you start now.

Beyond just learning about the problems with industrialized food yourself, there is another reason I want you all to run out and see this movie. Since it’s a documentary, it’s in a smaller group of theaters and will not get as much exposure to the general public as it should. The more these showings sell out, the more theaters they’ll put the film in. The more theaters its in, the more people see it. Simple. So by heading out to see it, you’re not just educating yourselves, your potentially helping to bring this important message to a wider audience.

Presently you can find out where the movie is playing here, and they’ve also supplied an online listing of where they are showing the film here.

So please, if you do nothing else for the environment or your health this week, run out and see Food Inc. I’d love to hear your thoughts after you’ve seen it and a word of advice before you head in–skip the soda and popcorn, you’ll be glad you did.

via Where Does Your Food Come From? | Healthy and Green Living.